Media coverage of “A Toronto Symphony”

CN Tower lighting pays tribute to World Première of Tod Machover’s A Toronto Symphony

Check out this press release from the CN Tower!!

 

March 9, 2013, approx. 9pm

March 7, 2013 (Toronto, ON) Toronto residents and all those within sight of the CN Tower are invited to watch a unique CN Tower light show synchronized to the world première of A Toronto Symphony: Concerto for Composer and City - the first symphony created for, by and about Torontonians.

Tune in to TSO.CA for a live webcast where you will hear a live audio feed of the concert as well as see visuals, which will include graphics, video, and photos illustrating both the piece and the process of its creation, alongside a live video feed of the CN Tower’s light show. The complete concert is performed live at Roy Thomson Hall on March 9, 2013 beginning 8pm, and the webcast and CN Tower lighting will be live with the A Toronto Symphony: Concerto for Composer and City première at approximately 9pm.  Continue reading

Countdown to the premiere!

Over the past year, I invited you – the citizens of Toronto – to collaborate with me to compose a new symphony which will be premiered by the Toronto Symphony Orchestra on March 9, 2013, at the New Creations Festival, just two weeks from today!

I wanted to share some recent stories in the press that nicely capture what this whole journey has been about. I thought the following articles were particularly well done. Enjoy!

 

I look forward to meeting you at the premiere!

- Tod

About the “A Toronto Symphony” project (video).

Reserve your tickets now.

Faces of “A Toronto Symphony”

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Partial portrait gallery of Torontonians who recorded short stories and comments on Tuesday at the Regent’s Park School of Music, so that their voices can be in heard – literally – in A TORONTO SYMPHONY. I’ll be combining voices and melodies tomorrow; what fun! Come hear it all in Toronto on March 9th (http://tinyurl.com/TodTorontoNC).

- Tod

Launch #3 – The City Soaring app!

To start off the New Year as musically as possible, we want to share another brand new music app with you. It’s a variant of Media Scores that we introduced last month, and it will allow you to subtly shape the texture, complexity and feel of the “City Soaring” melody from A Toronto Symphony. Designed by MIT Media Lab PhD student Peter Torpey, “City Soaring” has a pretty unusual interface that literally lets you paint the quality of a melody. Grab one of the four “brush” icons in the top right-hand corner of the app window – weight, complexity, texture and intensity – and paint over the line with it. You’ll immediately see the change in color and texture and will hear the changes when you play back the melody from the scroll bar at the bottom of the screen. Use the shift key with the same brushes and you can reduce that same quality. You’ll also notice a set of four curves in the lower half of the screen. Changing the shape of each curve is the same as painting with that quality directly on the line, although the feel is very different: the curves are good for big, overall changes; painting with brushes is better for very delicate and precise changes. Try them both. Continue reading

A guide to the Constellation app (video)

Now I want to show you a brand new app. It’s called Constellation. You’ll be able to experiment with it between now and the beginning of January. It was designed and written by Media Lab graduate student Akito van Troyer. I’ve taken some of the music I’ve composed for A Toronto Symphony, as well as many of the recorded sounds you’ve sent in. Constellation allows us to put those sounds up on the screen and mix them into your own collages, textures and pieces, just by experimenting with moving the mouse and combining these things. I’d love it if you’d go out and try it. Your collages and textures will give me new ideas about how to combine all the musical elements of the piece, and what you do might very well become a part of “A Toronto Symphony”…..which I am composing and collating at this very moment. Continue reading